TRAVELOCITIES

------------------------- Discover the WORLD in an INSTANT -------------------------

AUTHOR

EK Encarnacion, half-panda, half-polar bear, is a licensed chemist who dreams of making it big as a writer, chef and restaurateur, theater actor, and a traveling TV host. He dreams of traveling around the Philippines and around the world.

Like this blogger's Facebook Fan Page: EK Encarnacion Facebook Fan Page and/or follow him on Twitter: EK Encarnacion Twitter Page , and get up close and personal, and be updated with his newest blog entries.

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Travelocities is a blog that focuses on the adventures and thrills of traveling to new places. Travelocities is certified Pinoy blog. For a list of more Pinoy blogs, visit: Blogs ng Pinoy and Blog Directory for the Philippines

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Travelocities by EK Encarnacion is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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Disclaimer: All images in this blog are obtained from the internet unless specified by the author (EK Encarnacion). If by any means you see your photo was used and would like it to be given a more distinguished reference other than what was mentioned OR would like it to be removed, please feel free to contact the author through his email: ely.gamemaster.lyricist@gmail.com.

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11:21 PM
July 31st, 2013

Travel and Eat: 8 Must-Dine Places in El Nido and Puerto Princesa, Palawan

bipolarpandamonium:

By: EK Encarnacion

Char and I had been cautious with our food intake since the latter half of last year to become fitter but more importantly, healthier. However, neither one of us knew that our vacation in Palawan would end up being a five-day food trip. We had amnesia about our strict diets the moment we grabbed the chocolate-coated Korean ice cream sticks in a convenience store at the NAIA Terminal 3 Airport prior to boarding the plane bound for the province. And so if you’re planning to visit Palawan in the near future, you may want to write down our eight suggested dining places and invite your companion(s) to indulge in a series of Palawan feasts.

 

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

 

#8: Ugong Rock Cafe, Puerto Princesa (approx. 150-300 Php per meal)

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

Located near the municipal hall, Ugong Rock Cafe is a resto-bar where you can ask the staff to cook fresh seafood delivered from the outskirts of the city. The dining place is an open area divided into two. At one side is the kitchen adjacent to a glassed area where customers can pick their choice of seafood and the other side, a mini bar adjacent to a small stage where, during our visit, a young man in his late twenties was strumming his guitar and serenading us with beautiful Filipino love songs. Try their best sellers and some of their sizzling plates but be wary of their steamed baked mussels which the cooks may forget to drain off of excess water.

 

 

#7: Baker’s Hill, Puerto Princesa (approx. 250-1000 Php per meal)

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

Situated at one of the priciest areas of Palawan, Baker’s Hill literally stands on a hill near the farm of former congressman and incumbent governor Abraham Mitra. Since the establishment is quite distant from the city proper, renting a tricycle (250 Php for a round trip) may be the best option (PS: You can even use your charms to sway the driver into giving you an additional side trip to other nearby popular places). Baker’s Hill is a large compound with a bakery near the gate and is famous for their hopias, brownies, cookies and freshly baked breads. Don’t forget to buy some pasalubongs there. Across the bakery are two beautiful houses, perhaps by the owners. At the middle section of the compound are a fruit shake stall beside a restaurant that serves chicken, pork and beef-based dishes, and right across them, a restaurant that serves seafood. At the back end of the compound is a park-like labyrinth comprised of a playground, garden, an aviary and a tower for viewing the verdant lowlands.

 

#6: Firefly Watching with Dinner at Iwahig River, Puerto Princesa (1,100 Php)

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

The mangrove-lined banks of the Iwahig River are a famous tourist spot at night. Swarms of fireflies illuminate a specific species of mangrove trees with artificial red light as stimulus. The 30-minute dark and silent cruise through the meandering river is definitely love at first “light” and ends with a bountiful dinner at the mouth of Iwahig. There were only the two of us (Char and I) but it seemed that the dishes were enough for four people. We had grilled fish, sautéed shrimp, chicken adobo, trio of crabs, slices of eggplant and cucumbers, and seaweed salad among others. The only disadvantage of eating afloat are the myriads of small flying insects—mosquitoes and moths—that are attracted to heat and light.

 

 

#5: Badjao Seafront Restaurant (approx. 250-1000 Php per meal)

 

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

A dining place built on stilts, Badjao Seafront Restaurant offers a unique ethnic experience of eating over mangrove trees. Do not mix up this restaurant with the second branch, Badjao Inn Restaurant, which is located at the center of the city. During our visit, the water had, perhaps, receded into the open sea leaving the intertidal zone exposed and somewhat dry. Char and I arrived at Badjao Seafront Restaurant at night and had failed to partake in what the staff recommended to be a peaceful and astonishing dinner at dusk—a scrumptious late afternoon meal while the sun is slightly over the horizon shining its last bright red orange rays for the day on one side of the restaurant illuminating the interior with a mild glow and a tinge of happiness and serenity. The dishes served at Badjao Seafront Restaurant are common and a bit expensive but it is really the freshness of the ingredients and the indigenous before-dark encounter that urge locals and tourists to drop by at least once. It is highly recommended that reservations be made prior to visiting due to a large number of prospective diners especially during the second half of the restaurant’s operation hours.

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6:16 PM
July 6th, 2013

Travel: Top 8 Must-Visit Places in Ilocos Norte

bipolarpandamonium:

By: EK Encarnacion

Last April 19-21, 2013, I, along with my officemates, visited the province of Ilocos Norte through Sarap Mag Biyahe (SMB) Travel and Tours (Contact Details: Albert, 09176259694). Our itinerary was compact and flexible but it was able to include the best sites the region has to offer. I fell in love with the province so much that I find it shameful not to give it a space in my blog. And so if you are planning a trip of your own, I’ll give you a quick ride to eight must-visit places in Ilocos Norte which you can include in your travel.

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

Top 8: Patapat Viaduct

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Photograph by Dr. Alvin Umali

I was having a dilemma choosing between Patapat Viaduct and Cape Bojeador Lighthouse. But after much thought, I had to give the spot to Patapat Viaduct. Sure, the timeless Spanish-inspired Cape Bojeador Lighthouse is architecturally photogenic and the view of the jagged coastline bordering the South China Sea from the top of the hill is majestic but there isn’t really much to do once you get there. On the other hand, Patapat Viaduct is a long highway bridge located at the slopes of the mountains that connect the province of Ilocos Norte and Cagayan. The scenic, and sometimes windy, view of the Pasaleng Bay is refreshing to the eyes and the face. There is also a shady area along the road where people can go down and have a closer encounter with the waves. At the Cagayan end of the bridge, there is a grotto for devout Catholics and a line of food and novelty stores for shopaholics or for those who simply want to grab some pasalubongs.

PS: If this was a Top 9 checklist, I would have to give the last spot to Cape Bojeador Lighthouse. You may want to jot it down and check it as well.

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Photograph by Agnes De Asis

Top 7: Bangui Windmills

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Photograph by Marlon Aguinaldo

Branded as the Wind Farm of Southeast Asia, Bangui is home to a belt of large turbines that provide a percentage of power in Ilocos Norte. The beach is underdeveloped and uninhabited. But it is actually its rawness that contrasts the man-made tri-bladed tubular towers that makes it a favourite photo background. The area is also an auditorium where a duet between the natural swishing waves of the sea and anthropogenic whirring windmills can be heard.

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Photograph by Dr. Alvin Umali

Top 6: Fort Ilocandia

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

I don’t find it strange that Fort Ilocandia found its way in my checklist. After all, it is the best, not to mention five-star, hotel and resort in Laoag, Ilocos Norte. I was extremely overjoyed to have stayed at least for a night in one of the most lavish hotels in the country. And I’m not just talking about clean beds with comforters, high-powered air-conditioning units and a fancy bathtub. Fort Ilocandia also offers a fantastic buffet for guests, a seemingly Olympic-size pool, a beach front, a mini-zoo and aviary, and an area for sports and leisure among others.

 imagePhotograph by Agnes De Asis

Top 5: Kapurpurawan Rock Formation

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Photograph by Agnes De Asis

The Kapurpurawan Rock is a mass of limestone magnificently chiselled by the forces of the waves and the winds. Located at one of the farthest coasts of the town of Burgos, it may be reached by walking through a marked more-travelled path or riding a horse (100 Php for one way) along a rough but exciting terrain. Its ship-like centrepiece was already off limits during our visit to avoid hastening of weathering and erosion, and prolonging its grand sculpture.

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Photograph by EK Encarnacion

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11:35 PM
June 13th, 2012

Dito lang sa Pilipinas NAGTA-TRAFFIC

ng WALANG DAHILAN! At kung mayroon man, WALANG KA-KWENTA-KWENTA!

11:30 PM
June 9th, 2012

Mga Bangungot ng Biyahero (Part 2): Yung Pasaherong Naka-Slant o Nakabukaka Kahit Siksikan Na

Alam mo yung sardinas na nga kayo sa jeep dahil sa mga sugapang operators, drivers, at barkers; tapos yung isa sa mga pasahero sa upuan ninyo e naka-slant pa o di kaya e nakabukaka? 

Mano bang maging considerate man lang yung mga pasaherong ganun at isipin na ang binayad nila (kahit na doon pa sila sa terminal bababa) e yung pang-isang tao lang—unless siyempre binayaran rin nila yung pwestong yun. Pansinin mo na kapag sumakay ka ng jeep, marami sa mga pasahero ang hindi nakadiretso ang mga tuhod. Although karamihan ay umiiwas lang na matamaan ng dadaan sa gitna, may mga ilan pa rin na hindi mo mawari kung bakit kailangang ang buong binti ay nakadantay sa upuan. Ang masaklap pa kung minsan, sila pa ang galit kung mauupo ka sa tabi nila. At may ilan ding, nagsisiksik ng mga dalahin nila sa gitna ng kanilang binti. Mano bang ipatong nila sa mga binti at tuhod ang kanilang kagamitan. Hindi ba nila naiisip na malaki ang inookupang espasyo kapag hindi tuwid ang binti?

Ipaglaban mo ang iyong karapatan, after all nagbayad ka at karapat dapat ka rin na makaupo ng imprente. 

Mga Katulad na Artikulo

Mga Bangungot ng Biyahero (Part 1): Yung Gawing Pang-12 Yung Upuang Pang-10 Lang

10:14 PM
June 8th, 2012

Mga Bangungot ng Biyahero (Part 1): Yung Gawing Pang-12 Yung Upuang Pang-10 Lang

Alam mo yung sampuan lang yung magkabilang upuan ng jeep pero for some reason nagiging pang-labingdalawang katao bawat isa?

Nakakainis dahil sarado ang utak ng mga operators, drivers at barkers na ganito o ganyan lang ang bilang dapat ng mga pasahero. Hindi na importante kung komportable ka o hindi. Ang mahalaga sa kanila, makaabot sa kota. Hindi naman pare-pareho ang laki ng tao. Pero sa tuwing sasakay ka ng pampublikong sasakyan, isaksak mo na sa utak mo na ang may baywang na 38 inches ay pareho lang sa 28 inches. At kung magrereklamo ka naman, agad sasabihin ng mga operators, drivers o barkers, “e di magtaxi ka!” Pero dahil mas magastos ang magtaxi, titiisin mo na lang. Anupa’t kung ikaw ang panghuling sumakay, halos kalahati lang ng kaliwang pisngi ng pwet mo ang nakaupo ngunit sa parehong presyo na binayad ng iba pang pasahero. 

Mga Katulad na Artikulo

Mga Bangungot ng Biyahero (Part 2): Yung Pasaherong Naka-Slant o Nakabukaka Kahit Siksikan Na

10:38 PM
April 27th, 2011

it's me hap! i have sorting my blog entries now.


WOW. I’m expecting a lot of entries from you! :)

10:38 PM
April 27th, 2011

rojisimo wrote...
It's Red. Nagkamali lang yung barista maglagay sa cup ko. Haha! Yes, I'm online most of the time. Ikaw? :)

Sorry, I couldn't find the ask link on your other blog. :p


RED, ok na ba yung ibang blogs ko?

9:13 PM
April 25th, 2011

This is very helpful especially when I am on my first flight outside d country. I hope to get some tips from a globetrotter like u! keep on posting!


Ikaw pala yan sei! Hahaha. Hopefully, I can put on a lot of posts to help other future backpackers. :)

11:28 PM
December 12th, 2010

A Taste of Vietnamese-Cambodian Slapstick

By: EK Encarnacion

The conductor inserted the DVD and the television showed images. I was waiting for a Warner Brothers or Paramount or 21st Century Fox or Dreamworks or any other international movie production logo to appear but to no avail. Instead, there was just a park.

And then out came actors and actresses dancing and pushing each other, frolicking the park square like a bunch of kindergartens in a carnival to the tune of some festive music. It was just weird, not to mention, very Asian. And then they stopped and started conversing in a language which at first I had trouble deciphering. And then I realized that I couldn’t really figure it out anyways so I gave up listening. I look closely at the screen and saw subtitles. I squinted to read the words as my mom and I were sitting somewhere at the back portion of the bus. I narrowed my eyes until I saw the characters clearly. It was Chinese and Arabic.

I was hopeless.

The actors were conversing in such a way that they seemed to be giving jokes. After every set of punch lines delivered, all actors and actresses burst into laughter in such an overacting manner that it was not just painful to the ears but also to the eyes as well. I look outside and saw the road which sidewalks are covered in what appears to be Iron-rich soil. I was still in the provincial area of Cambodia. There were trees and shrubs and grasses. There were houses made of wood and concrete. There were people and their animals—some, ploughing the field; some, hanging clothes to dry; and others, just running across the dirt. The images kept repeating until I realized that I have exhausted all the imagination I have and turned back to the television.

There I saw the Vietnamese or Cambodian actors and actresses performing skits. In one scene, two actors were knocking at some old lady’s gate. Afterwards, they went running away when she was about to open the gate. They continued to do the prank for six consecutive times. I could no longer imagine how dragging that joke was. But by the end of the skit, the old lady grabbed a pail full of water and threw the liquid upon opening the gate. Pity she drenched a police officer instead and got arrested.  In another scene, a teacher was getting bribes from the parents of his students. The students were all grown-ups dressed in elementary uniforms. He did not enjoy the florist’s son’s flowers or the librarian’s daughter’s books. He, however, was delighted with the box given by the winemaker’s son’s box. He saw that there was something leaking. He touched the hole and wet his finger with the liquid. He placed it in his mouth and was astounded with the taste of what seemed to be the best wine he had ever tasted. When he asked the son what wine was inside, the student opened and revealed a puppy. In another, the actors and actresses were running from what seemed to be a pack of zombies. They ran and panted in between until they reached a junction where they had to choose between a road that leads to a jungle and a road that leads to a cemetery. They kept on fighting and arguing until they saw the wave of zombies approaching. The actors and actresses scrambled in fear. Some of them went to the jungle while the others to the cemetery. Those that went to the jungle were bitten by snakes while those that went to the cemetery bumped into another set of zombies leading to everyone’s demise.

After the credits rolled, revealing the names of the actors and actresses and the production staff; I was just stupefied on my seat with my jaw dropped and mind floating. I just really wanted to get off the bus as I could no longer endure another series of unfunny comedy.

But then after I have lain in bed that night, I realized how significant that DVD was. Even though I do not want to watch it, I was forced to look at it for lack of entertainment. I realized that the DVD was already a form of advertisement, a medium which the natives use to present their culture to tourists like me. I may not understand everything in the show but perhaps some other passenger may have gathered words or phrases which he or she could use for conversations. I may have disliked the skits but the other foreigners may have seen the creativity embedded in the mainland Asian performing arts.

And everything boils down to one idea—a matter of perspective. 

Flying to another country from the Philippines? Learn how to make your way through the Ninoy Aquino International Airport by clicking on the following link:

Making Your Way through the Ninoy Aquino International Airport

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

EK Encarnacion wished he understood everything in that DVD. To learn more of his epic failures, visit his other blogs: Every-Comedy-Thing (life blog), Culinary Coliseum (food blog), and By God’s Grace (gratitutde blog). You may also throw your support by liking his Facebook Fan Page and his Triond Page

11:31 PM
December 11th, 2010

Ho Chi Minh-Phnom Penh Bus Ride

By: EK Encarnacion

As I munched on some chocolate cupcakes, the bus driver took his seat, steered the wheel and began what seemed to be a good journey across Vietnam and Cambodia. Well, at least that’s what I thought it would be via the Sapaco Bus.

Sapaco Tourist Bus (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

TRAVELOCITIES REMINDER #1

Sapaco is a popular bus company in Vietnam. Its main terminal in Saigon is located at District 1 at the intersection of Pham Ngu Lao Road and Do Quang Dao Street. The said terminal opens for business at around 5:30 in the morning. The schedule of departure of buses are 6:00 am, 7:00 am, 8:00 am, 9:00 am, 10:00 am, 11:30 am and 1:00 pm. Sapaco is said to be one of those that offers the cheapest modes of transportation from Saigon to Phnom Penh, Cambodia (approximately 6 hours travel) and from Saigon to Siem Reap, Cambodia (approximately 12 hours travel). The Saigon to Phnom Penh fare ranges from 11-15 US$ while the Saigon to Siem Reap fare falls within 18-22 US$.  Bus fares are dependent both on the route to be taken and the services included. The usual amenities claimed by the bus company are air-conditioning, checking of passports, usage of toilet, a wet towel, a bottle of water, immigration processing, and a rest stop. For non-ASEAN passport holders, a visa entry for Cambodia is required. The bus company also claims to handle visa processing for about 24-26 US$. Sapaco also promises tagging of checked-in luggage for security, a hand towel, and a snack. But my mom and I were certain that during our travel the company missed out on these three. Despite its appeal to budget backpackers, the bus company has also earned negative comments from a lot (and I really mean it) of dissatisfied (and some, abused) customers. A popular and oftentimes considered to be the most patronized and most suitable substitute for Sapaco Bus is the Mekong Express. Its fare falls on the same range as Sapaco but the services are said to be more complete thus allowing the company to receive a downpour of good reviews.

While the vehicle was making its way through narrow streets towards the expressway going to Cambodia, the bus conductor was verifying and collecting passports (and visa for non-ASEAN passengers) for easy processing at the Vietnam-Cambodia border. My mom took the liberty of communicating with the grumpy conductor (he was really being unfriendly—a said characteristic of Sapaco Bus staff according to another blog entry) while I was taking some shots of the bus interior and the busy city outside. 

Checking of Passports (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

Motorcycle-Crowded Intersection (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

A Glimpse of Jollibee (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

There wasn’t really much to see—roadways, houses, apartments, inns, motels, hotels, cafes, bars, restaurants, malls, public terminals, ports, wet markets, and a lot of other typical urban establishments. Ho Chi Minh resembles other metropolises in Southeast Asia. Thank goodness I brought my iPod shuffle to provide me some audio entertainment as I stare with ennui at the monotonous city scenery. (I just notice how I tend to become redundant—“boredom overload” perhaps). But really, it was impossible not to fall into a deep slumber.

Z-z-Z-z-Z *snore*

TRAVELOCITIES TIP #1

If you’re not the type of person who is fond of sleeping during trips (such as I am), then I suggest you bring 2-3 books to read, a fully-charged gadget that can provide you audio entertainment, and/or a few snacks that can satisfy your palate. If you wish, you may also bring your portable DVD player or laptop. But these are items that I am not endorsing as you may be catching the attention of nearby criminals. 

 

I felt the bus coming into a halt. My mom was waking me up and telling me that we were already nearing the Vietnam-Cambodia border. We were asked to get down from the bus and present ourselves to the immigration. We needed to get our passports marked with the “departure” stamp so as to prove ourselves cleared of all other possible duties and responsibilities in Vietnam.

Immigration Office at the Vietnam Portion of the Border (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

The process at the immigration office (Vietnam portion of the border) was slow and, in my opinion, discriminative. All passengers were asked to wait as names were called out. I remembered how the conductor piled our passports and I knew that my mom and I should have been called within the first ten. But we were not. Apparently, the immigration officers were calling out names of those they can easily pronounced first—mostly Vietnamese, Cambodian and other mainland nationalities. In the end, I learned that most of those who were left behind were mostly Filipinos and Westerners. But I would have understood if it was the only problem.

A second bus has just arrived with a new set of passengers bound for Phnom Penh. And with the most unfortunate and cruel of all circumstances, the immigration officers called out names of locals from the said group first, instead of us who were left behind from the first bus. We were quite disappointed with the unfair process. But not one of us complained because we all know how immigration officers can cause greater trouble if we raise our concerns—for all we know, we may end up being stuck in Vietnam for some made up violation. But again, as what I have mentioned in Part 5 of my Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) travel journal, I am writing such bad experiences so as not to ruin the image of the Vietnamese or any other people for that matter but rather to warn other tourists about such delinquents lurking and giving dishonour to good societies.

After the immigration officer called out my name (I believe I was sixth from last) and my mom’s (she was third from last), we went out of the office and hurried inside the bus to take our seats. I would have wanted to take photographs near the premises of the Vietnam portion of the border but considering the facts that we were last and everyone inside the bus were already waiting for us including the grumpy conductor whose face looked so annoyed (as if it was our fault we got stuck inside!), and that my mom and I did not feel happy taking pictures after standing inside the office for a long time, no one can actually blame us for our choice to head back inside the vehicle.

Monument behind the Immigration Office at the Vietnam Portion of the Border (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

A less-than-a-minute ride (literally!) followed and we were once again asked to get off the bus and enter the immigration office (Cambodia portion of the border).

Cambodian Marker (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

Unlike at the Vietnam portion of the border, my mom and I were blessed to be assigned to one of those officers who were able to process documents and stamp passports quickly but efficiently. It was not long after when we found ourselves heading to the exit after a few minutes. We were just about to step outside when we were greeted by a man. “Kumusta kayo?” (Filipino translation of “How are you?”), he said. I replied with, “Mabuti naman po” (Filipino translation of “I’m fine”) and immediately asked, “Gaano na po kayo katagal nagtatrabaho dito?” (Filipino translation of “How long have you been working here?”). He first answered with a smile then continued with, “Sorry, I’m not Filipino. With many Filipinos visiting Cambodia, I was able to learn a few phrases myself.” Hearing his reply made me realize that we, Pinoys, being well-travelled and scattered all over the world, should be having this impact on other nationalities. We should actually be promoting our culture, tradition and language. The Chinese have done an amazing job influencing the world such that it is impossible not to see a Chinatown in a certain country. In addition, Mandarin has become a part of the curricula in many schools and universities worldwide. Would it be nice to have our own Pinoy Villages around the world? And would it be kind-of cool to have other nationalities speaking in our native language? What an ease in communication! I bid the man farewell and joined my mom outside for some photo-ops.

Immigration Office at the Cambodia Portion of the Border (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

The immigration office (Cambodia portion of the border) was just stunning to look at. With intricate roof engravings and other embellishments, the infrastructure may actually be mistaken to be a temple. My mom and I did not hesitate to take some pictures of the building and, of course, of ourselves.

Behind the Immigration Office at the Cambodia Portion of the Border (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

Me at the Border (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

My Mom and I (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

We then headed inside the bus to rest as we wait for other passengers. When the conductor finished his head count and realized that all were accounted, the driver made its way to new territory—Cambodia. Several majestic casinos welcomed us as we travel through the highway. It was just surprising for my part since I never envisioned Cambodia to be fond of such entertainment especially that it is considered to be a developing country such as the Philippines.

Titan Casino (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

Hours have gone by like minutes and the bus made a stop to allow passengers to have a late lunch. I wasn’t really hungry so it was only my mom who went down and got herself a bowl of steaming noodle soup. It was not long after when the passengers started entering the bus. The conductor did his usual head count when the vehicle seemed full inside and gave the driver a go signal to start the final leg of our journey.

The sceneries to Phnom Penh were rural as oppose to the urban setting just outside Ho Chi Minh. Several little houses lined the roadsides while a few large houses stand somewhere in the middle of the plains. The main highway was somewhat asphalted but the reddish-brown soil have caused it to appear dirty.

It was not long after when we reached a river that cuts across a portion of Cambodia. My mom told me that a small boat able to contain a number of land vehicles will be used to reach the other bank. She said that if the bus driver decided to cross via the bridge located several kilometres away from where we were at the moment, it would take us ages to reach Phnom Penh. And so I was quite amazed that a mode of transportation similar to our very own Ro-Ro (i.e. Roll-on, Roll-off boat) was also being effectively utilized in Cambodia.

Boat Ride (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

The crossing of the bank was relatively faster than what I expected. In a matter of minutes, I found the bus once again making its way through the highway. At this point, the conductor decided to turn on the television and insert a DVD inside the player. I was quite excited to know what the crew decided to feature. And after a few adjustments to the volume and contrast, (Alas!) it was a show that brought me a terrible headache that lasted for an entire night! But the details of that, my friends, will be available in my next blog entry. 

It was a rainy afternoon when the bus reached the heart of Phnom Penh. Different establishments and monuments lined both sides of the road—all drenched by the pouring rain.

Raindrops (Photograph by EK Encarnacion)

The bus finally swerved to the terminal where my godmother, uncle and cousins were waiting for our arrival. My mom and I got our baggage and headed towards our relatives. And after a few hugs and kisses, my cousin exclaimed, “Welcome to Cambodia, Kuya!”

Flying to another country from the Philippines? Learn how to make your way through the Ninoy Aquino International Airport by clicking on the following link:

Making Your Way through the Ninoy Aquino International Airport


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

It was EK Encarnacion's first time to travel from one country to another via land transportation. Although quite relatively uneasy during the entire trip, he believes that it was essential that he was able to experience such in life. To learn more of his viewpoints, visit his other blogs: Every-Comedy-Thing (life blog), Culinary Coliseum (food blog), and By God’s Grace (gratitutde blog). His works are also indexed at one of the best Pinoy blogs, The Filipino Diaspora.